Throwback Thursday #54 – Raindrops on Roses

Maggie is our host for Throwback Thursday this week. She wants to know about our favorite things while adolescents.  She says: Pick any period of your adolescence and think back to all your favorite things. Feel free to elaborate as much as you want.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Favorite Things

Who was your favorite relative? Not to play favorites, but who was the person you connected with more than others? Aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, or parent? Why were you closest to them? As a teen, I would have to say that my paternal grandparents were my favorite relatives. I wasn’t able to see them as much as I would have liked to, but they were always kind and loving to me. Having them in my life made me who I am today. I am forever grateful that when my mom divorced their son, they still wanted us in their lives. 

What was your favorite TV show? Share a clip if you can find one. I was hooked on Get Smart and Bewitched for sure. I never saw this intro to Bewitched before. before. It was awesome.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057733/?ref_=ttls_li_tt 

What was your favorite book or favorite family story? I read a great deal as a young child. As a teen I was much more involved with journaling and writing poetry. 

What was your favorite, song, record, or album. Feel free to share a YouTube video of it. I was still hooked on the Beatles as a teen. I will admit that I listened to a wide variety of music, but the Beatles were my go to group.

Who was your favorite teacher? What grade were you in and what subject did they teach? I had a favorite teacher as a 6th grader, Mr. Brick. In high school, my favorite teacher was Mr. Tavenor. He gave me confidence to participate in public speaking and debate groups. I stayed in school because of him. He cared about his students and didn’t just work for the paycheck.

What was your favorite subject (not teacher) in school? Home Economics was my favorite subject in school. The teacher was very young and I admired her a great deal. I learned about cooking and sewing, which have been important in my life, to this day.

Who was your favorite (aka best) friend? What things did you do together? I had two best friends, R and L. We hung out at each other’s houses, cooked desserts, and went to concerts at the Forum. (R’s mom had season tickets to great shows) We talked on the phone, practically nonstop.  

What was your favorite way to pass the time? As a teen, I loved to write poetry and fiction stories. I journaled every day. I stopped writing poetry when bio-dad said it was a total waste of time after I sent him some of my poems. 

What was your favorite holiday? How did you celebrate? My favorite holiday was Passover. It is not at all what you would think of as a “fun” holiday. We had the 5 hour dinner and read the entire Haggadah both in English and Hebrew (my aunt, uncle, grandma and grandpa.) What I loved was the rich heritage I was exposed to. It was wonderful to be with family because I had no other relatives nearby. I still love Passover. I enjoy sharing my meal with friends and family whenever possible. 

What was your favorite toy or possession? Doll, camera, radio, bicycle? My records were my favorite possessions. They gave me company and joy.

Bonus: What was your favorite adventure? Family trip, amusement park, field trip, or vacation perhaps. I never went on a vacation as a kid. There was no money for that. Back in the day, Knott’s Berry Farm was free. I went with friends as a teen and that was terrific.

Throwback Thursday – #40 – Birthday Blasts

It’s my turn again. Happily, my brain is engaging more than it has for a week. Yesterday was my birthday. I honestly expected to be feeling down. It has nothing to do with my  age. I am happy to complete another trip around the sun. It’s all the other stuff going on in my world. I had a good joyful birthday. Phone calls and messages made me very happy.  This week I’d like you to think back to  the birthdays you remember.  This topic should again be one that everyone relates to in one way or another.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Birthday Blasts

1) What’s your earliest birthday memory?
2) What was your favorite birthday and why?
3) What’s the best birthday present you have ever received?
4) Did you ever get money as a birthday gift?
5) What did you like to do on your birthday as a kid? What do you like to do now?
6) Did you have birthday parties with friends or family parties?
7) Did you get to pick the food for your birthday? Did you prefer to eat a home cooked meal or to eat out at a restaurant on your birthday?
8) Did your family have any fun birthday traditions? Did you continue those traditions with your own kids?
9) Did you ever get to take the day off school on your birthday? As an adult did/do you take the day off?
10) Have you ever had a surprise birthday party? Was it a real surprise, or did you know it was coming?

Bonus Question:
If you had a million dollars to spend only on your next birthday, what would you do?

My response follows* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * *

My earliest memory is my kindergarten birthday. My mom had the babysitter make a chocolate cake. It was waiting for me when I got home from school. I was allowed to eat a slice before dinner. I felt very special. My brothers didn’t get any until after dinner.  Oh, the fun things we remember.

My favorite birthday was in 8th grade. We were renting the house across the street from where I grew up. I was allowed to invite a few friends over to celebrate with me. It was the first time my birthday was more than a family affair. We did not do the whole house decorating thing back then. We ate snacks and ate cake. We played out front and sang silly songs together. I don’t recall if gifts were given. I was just so thrilled to have a couple of friends over, that it made my day super special.

My best present was the record player and LPs on my 13th birthday. It meant I could listen to MY MUSIC in my bedroom. I had to play 45s in the living room prior to that. It was scratchy compared to the music I listen to now, but it was great back then.

Our birthdays were always similar. We were able to pick out the dinner we wanted. Most of the time we ate at home. Then we’d eat homemade cake, blow out candles, and open presents. Through middle school and most of high school I wanted liver and mashed potatoes. (My brothers hated my birthday food choices.) Once I learned how bad liver is for you, I stopped eating it.

When we were older my mom found a restaurant a long drive away that had this new idea of “all you can eat buffet.” Marmack’s served the most delicious prime rib. (Mom made prime rib only once that I can remember.) The price of the meal was more than double what we had ever paid to go out to eat. I don’t remember what the occasion was that took us there the first time. I do remember that whenever it was a special occasion after that, we would request the prime rib restaurant. On the few occasions my mom could afford it, we went there. We kids were all tall and skinny. I’m sure the restaurant thought they were going to be ahead on the price of the meal. They were very wrong. We were known to go back and get seconds, thirds, fourths, and fifths (my older brother) on prime rib. We even loved the mashed potatoes and desserts.  Mom always got her money’s worth when we ate there.

As a child, my birthday was all about opening presents. Our presents were always clothes and one toy or nonclothing item. I was grateful for the clothes but hoped for some more nonclothing items every year. Being a May birthday child, I would get summer clothes and a bathing suit every year. It meant summer vacation was coming soon, so I was happy.

My mom never gave us money as a gift. I would get money from my grandmother every year. She actually sent cash way back in the day. It was exciting to have cash to spend.

Now birthdays are best when I can celebrate with loved ones. This year I heard from family and friends via cards, FB messages, text messages, and phone calls. I was able to connect with some amazing people. The universe blessed me this year.

We were never able to take the day off on our birthday. My mom worked and taking the day off was out of the question. When my children were in school, my mom would take them out for lunch and go shopping for their birthday present. She would often buy them things she knew I wouldn’t approve of. (She bought them crazy large earrings, short miniskirts, and tons of candy.)

I don’t think I’ve ever taken my birthday off work. However, it occasionally fell on Memorial Day so I would tell my students I was giving them my birthday off.

I tried to make my kid’s birthdays special. We were short on money through most of their young years. I made homemade cupcakes for their class when they were in school. Books were always on their gift list. When they were older, they were given the choice of gifts or special outings. My older daughter often chose to go to Disneyland with the family. We would often go on Super Bowl Sunday. It was before taping the game, so the park would be relatively empty. We visited amusement parks for birthdays often.

I never had a surprise birthday as a child. My first and only one was on my 50th birthday. My husband kept asking strange questions which piqued my interest. When a phone call came in about a 6-foot sandwich, the cat was out of the bag. I pretended not to know about what was going on. Bless his heart, he tried hard to keep a secret from me.

If I had a million to spend on just one birthday, I would fly my family and friends on the Concord (Yes, I know it’s not supposed to fly again until 2029.) to vacation in Scotland, Wales, and Ireland.

 

Throwback Thursday – #38 Visits to Doctors and/or Dentists

We are back in our usual groove now. Last week Maggie asked us about how we were led to the music in our lives.  This week we’d like you to think back to those early experiences visiting the doctor and/or the dentist. This topic should again be one that everyone relates to in one way or another.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Remembering Visits to Doctors and/or Dentists

There are many adults with severe concerns about going to the doctor or dentist. The fear of doctors, known as iatrophobia, is often strong enough to provoke “white coat syndrome.” Normally healthy blood pressure can soar in the presence of a medical professional. Dentophobia, or fear of dentists, often occurs alongside iatrophobia. I’d like you to think back to your early medical and/or dental visits.

As usual, you can respond to the following questions as they are, or you can use them to spark your own memories to write your post.

1) Where doctor/dentist appointments a regular part of your childhood?

2) Did you go for well-checks or just when you were ill or in pain?

3) Were you frightened by the medical professionals? If so, were there specific reasons?

4) Were your parents afraid of medical professionals?

5) Was waiting in the exam room stressful to you?

6) Did your early visits result in your being afraid of needles?

7) Does the sight of your own blood bother you?

8) Did you ever have the need to go to an emergency room?

9) Did your early experiences impact your current attitudes about medical care?

My post will follow soon.

 

Throwback Thursday #36 – Gone But Not Forgotten

Maggie’s post last week, got me thinking. Please bear me as I attempt to explain another easy topic for April. Those of you completing A to Z, way to go. You’re near the finish line.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Things I Don’t Miss

Many of us had let’s say “challenging” childhood experience. Others were gifted with loving kind families. I don’t want to pursue the dark places. I’d like to keep it light and fun to look back on some childhood/young adult things you don’t miss having in your life. It could be an activity you are glad you don’t have to do, a place you are glad you don’t have to go, a habit you’re glad you no longer have, etc. Write about one thing or write about a few. You do you.

My post follows:

I don’t miss having to eat awful things that someone made me eat, like pearl onions or Brussel sprouts. (Even my dog wouldn’t touch them.) We had an open area behind our house. My brothers and I became experts at hiding them in napkins or clothing and then throwing them over the back fence after dinner. 

I don’t miss having a bedtime that didn’t fit my bodies time clock. I would lay in bed for hours unable to sleep. I will admit to the flashlight and a book under the covers being my saving grace. I think my mom knew what was going on, but figured as long as I was quiet, it was OK.

I don’t miss being in high school where I was confidant that I knew more than many of my teachers. It’s easy to learn from those you respect and extremely difficult to learn from those you don’t. Gratefully, along with the bad, there were some good ones. College was so much better because if the teacher was less than stellar, you could often switch out for another one. 

I don’t miss having someone else pick out clothes for me. I would often have to wear something gifted to me that I hated. It’s funny how some clothes just wore out or got torn much easier than others.

I don’t miss having to do all the chores in the house because I was the only girl. (OK, this is a little bit of a dark place.) When I married my now ex, he did the dishes and I mowed the lawns. I wanted to raise my girls to know everyone should know how to do every household chore and they should not be gender specific.

In order to keep myself from droning on, I shall stop here. 

What do you not miss?

Throwback Thursday #34 – Learning To Swim

I am back again for the April modified Throwback Thursday.  Maggie and I take turns writing this blog. Because many are involved in the A to Z Challenge, April’s prompts are going to be without specific questions. You can choose to go where your mind takes you. Feel free to respond however your mind wants to go. But please also remember, this is a family friendly blog.

As always you can:

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • Feel free to add pictures if you’d like to.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

My choice for this week’s prompt is: Learning To Swim

How, when, where, and why did you learn to swim? Have fun with the prompt. I look forward to your responses.

My response follows. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

I am going to start with the time I did not learn to swim. It is a vivid memory. We went to a friend’s house and no cajoling, prompting, or bribing would get me into the pool. Everyone was having a great time. I stubbornly, wouldn’t even put my feet into the water. I was playing with the family dog and using the hose to chase him. After a wonderful BBQ lunch everyone was relaxing on towels and lounging on chairs. I walked over to the deep end of the pool and proclaimed, “I go in now!” and jumped in. I don’t recall who got to me first, but there were many wet adults in the pool when I was brought up to the surface. I was not traumatized or scared. I sputtered the water out of my mouth and laughed at it all.   

Many years later, we were at Puddingstone Park. It was great because there were no waves that knocked you down. It was a very primitive area at the time. My mom took me out wading and asked if I wanted to swim. She proceeded to hold me up while I dog paddled away. I was swimming before too long. We went back often to swim there. When I got older, I would swim at friend’s houses. I was nowhere near the swimmer my brother was, but I felt safe swimming in lakes, pools, and the Pacific Ocean. In high school, we were required to take swimming as one of our PE rotations. I was thrilled knowing I was not a “rock.” That was the name for the girls that were afraid of the water.