Fibbin’ Friday

FibbinFridayHalloween2020A shout out to  Maggie at From Cave Walls for helping me to get back in the blogging world.

Frank brings us the questions today for Fibbin’ Friday. He asks that we do NOT tell the truth.  The more you fib, the better. Melanie has this wonderful graphic for the October fibs. 

The questions are here:

  1. Why is October the tenth month rather than the eighth as its name implies?
  2. Why is Halloween on October 31st?
  3. What exactly is “Pumpkin Spice”?
  4. How did the tradition of carving Jack-o’-lanterns start?
  5. Why are they called “Jack-o’-lanterns”?
  6. Why is National Poetry Writing Month (NaPoWriMo) in April when National Poetry Day is October 3rd?
  7. What’s the big deal about Columbus Day?
  8. Why do kids trick-or-treat on Halloween?
  9. According to at least one Internet source, October 30th is National Candy Corn Day. Why?
  10. What happens to all the candy corn that doesn’t get eaten?
  1. Why is October the tenth month rather than the eighth as its name implies? Because tentember has a really strange  feel to it.
  2. Why is Halloween on October 31st?  November 1st was typically a day to fill out progress reports. Teachers needed a day to complete report cards when kids were too hyped up to learn. After the kids went trick-or-treating, teachers had a free day or fun day to let the kids work off the sugar.
  3. What exactly is “Pumpkin Spice”? Pumpkin spice it the wonderful essence of the pumpkin once it has been baked and crumbled. You put the pieces in a mortar and grind it to a soft spice to be used in delicious cookies and cakes.
  4. How did the tradition of carving Jack-o’-lanterns start? Originally Jack-o’-lanterns were gourds not pumpkins. They were super cheep to purchase. Kids would hollow them out and needed a way to use them as a lantern. They creatively cut out designs to allow the light to show through. As is typical, the adults decided to compete against each other and the designs became more and more intricate. The pumpkins were easier to carve. They also had a greater surface area to make designs on.
  5. Why are they called “Jack-o’-lanterns”? There was a very loud parent who was known throughout the town who would scream for her son Jack to bring the cheap gourd lanterns. The original saying was, “Hey Jack, bring those ol lanterns here NOW!”
  6. Why is National Poetry Writing Month (NaPoWriMo) in April when National Poetry Day is October 3rd? One was started by a Republican and the other was started by a Democrat. Enough said?
  7. What’s the big deal about Columbus Day? Columbus Day is celebrated because a silly man refused to ask for directions and then claimed a large parcel of land as his own, even though it was already inhabited. It is a big deal nowadays, because people see it as celebrating  the downfall of indigenous people.
  8. Why do kids trick-or-treat on Halloween? Once upon a time, kids realized that the summer sweets (fruit) were gone and it was a long haul until Christmas candy would present itself. The kids gathered together and went house to house to see if anyone had any left over treats. They got angry if they thought some people had candy, but refused to share it. Hence, tick or treat, became their war cry.
  9. According to at least one Internet source, October 30th is National Candy Corn Day. Why? Just as Hallmark created days for people to spend their money on cards for strange, made-up days, the candy makers made up a day to sell their new candy. The candy makers believed that if they threw in the name “corn” then parent might believe the super sugar treat had some nutritional value.
  10. What happens to all the candy corn that doesn’t get eaten? The town fool takes all the candy corn that is not eaten and plants it in a field and hopes to grow new candy. He can be seen watching the ground until after January 1.

16 thoughts on “Fibbin’ Friday

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